MONEY, SEX AND POWER

Money, Sex and Power – what do these three have in common? First of all the feeling they provide. They all tickle our inner buddy, the ego, that’s for sure. When we have either of these we do feel good. And it’s no news that all three have addictive character. Once you get the taste of money, it’s hard to get used to having less – be it for a short time. Having money gives you a certain feeling of safety, freedom, independence and power. Feeling powerful boost your self-confidence and makes you more gutsy. Not to forget that money can buy both sex and power; this refers to power as having some important public function, or other cases of bribery. There are also many cases when the lack of money makes us feel powerless. It makes us think that our possibilities are limited. Money – fulfills the material need, makes the connection with the outer reality; Sex – fulfils the physical needs; Power – equates with the psychical and spiritual needs.
(The Fantastic Three: Money, Sex and Power by wittyartist at money-pulse.co.uk)
The richer you are, apparently, the better sex you have. That’s according to a survey of more than 600 high-net-worth individuals. And rich women, it seems, enjoy sex the most.
“In seeking a higher-quality sexual experience, the number of well-heeled women that lead more adventurous and exotic sex lives, have had an affair or joined the mile-high club far outdistances that of men — and the affluent gender gap in views on sex doesn’t end there,” Hannah Shaw Grove and Russ Alan Prince, two well-known researchers on the habits of the rich and famous, found. Grove and Prince surveyed people with an average net worth of $89 million, and who make more than $9 million per year. They found that money is an enabler in a number of ways to enhance sexual experiences.
“The majority of men and women credit their private wealth with achieving a better sex life. When viewed separately, a larger percentage of women agree with the statement, perhaps indicating that females derive a greater degree of empowerment from their financial independence than their male counterparts,” the survey, “Money as an Aphrodisiac — Being Rich Means Getting Lucky on Your Own Terms,” found.
(More money, better sex reported and written by Thomas Kostigen for MarketWatch at articles.moneycentral.msn.com)
Women like men who are generous with money; men like women who are generous in bed. A man fantasizes about a woman who’ll rock his world in the sack; a woman fantasizes about a man who’ll rock her world at Tiffany’s. Both genders are looking for love… For him, nothing says “I love you” like good sex; for her, nothing says “I love you” like financial security. Perhaps Katharine Hepburn was right when she mused: “Sometimes I wonder if men and women really suit each other. Perhaps they should live next door and just visit now and then.”
Each gender has its standard complaint about the other… Women lament that all men want is sex, and men grumble that women spend too much money. Could it be true that men and women really DO come from different planets? Men are horn dogs from Mars and women are gold diggers from Venus?
The romantics among us cringe: “Oh no, you’ve got it all wrong! Love is a matter of the soul and character… not dollars and sex.” Those who consider themselves liberated are incredulous: “Haven’t we moved beyond those dated stereotypes?”
But it’s likely that what some consider “dated stereotypes” may actually be timeless truths. A woman’s social currency is her youth, beauty, charm and sexuality; a man’s social currency is his professional and financial success. Men gain status by what they do; women gain status by who they’re with. Just because it isn’t politically correct doesn’t mean it isn’t true.
Consider the possibility that our attitudes and behaviors concerning money are programmed by thousands of years of evolution, not just a dozen years of childhood socialization. Consider that perhaps the generations of humans who came before us were doing what comes naturally: Men offered protection and provisions, while women offered fertility and family. Biology was destiny. “Has nothing changed since Tarzan and Jane?” you might ask.
And history illustrates that “power is (still) the ultimate aphrodisiac” (Henry Kissinger) and money is the most potent form of power. Rich, powerful men can have all the young, pretty women they want … Consider tens of thousands of wealthy men throughout history. These men provided status, protection, and security to their women — who in turn provided youth, beauty, sensuality and charm to their men. Everybody got what they wanted, illegally and immorally.
We shouldn’t underestimate Mother Nature. Tens of thousands of years of mating instincts and behavior still exert a powerful influence on us today, whether we want to acknowledge it or not. Many men still want sex and will trade money to get it, while many women still want security and will trade sex to get it. We’ve come a long way, baby … but we ain’t there yet.
(Money and Sex: The Mating Game in the 21st Century by BJ Gallagher, Sociologist, best-selling author and popular speaker at huffingtonpost.com)
A professor of neuroscience and psychology from Stanford University, Brian Knutson, made a startling discovery: our brains lust after money with the same neurons they crave sex. Moreover, these are the same neurons with which one experiences the high from cocaine.
Knutson concluded that the pleasure of orgasm, the high from cocaine, the rush from buying stokes are governed by the same neural network. Furthermore, these primal pleasure circuits can, and often do, override the functioning of the brain’s frontal cortex which governs rational thoughts. In other words, the desire of winning more money can sometimes drive people crazy, just like the desire for sex or drugs.
This discovery is striking as it contradicts one of the most of cherished Wall Street ideals – the idea that when it comes to money, logic prevails, that investing is governed by rational decisions. This idea is the basis of the economic theory of rational expectations, for which Robert Lucas won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1995.
(Addicted to Sex and Money by Vlad Tarko at news.softpedia.com)

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